2013: Audrey’s music has been featured in various TV shows including Dance Mom’s, Glee, Teen Mom, American Pickers, 16 and Pregnant. Two of Audrey’s songs were also used in Whole Foods commercials.

Listen to and/or purchase any of Audrey’s records:

http://www.audreyryan.bandcamp.com

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/audreyryan

“The Need to be Heard” is out! Audrey’s book about being a DIY artists. It was published by Burst and Bloom Records and you can find out more about it here on the link “The Need to be Heard” or purchase a copy at:

http://burstandbloomrecords.com/books/the-need-to-be-heard/

To get the Kindle version of the book on Amazon for only $2.99 - http://www.amazon.com/The-Need-To-Be-Heard-ebook

 

Since releasing her debut record, “Passing Thru”, in 2004 Audrey’s been on the road touring in the US and Europe. She’s released her last four albums (“Dishes & Pills” (2007), “I Know, I Know” (2009), “Thick Skin” (2011), “Sirens” (2012) on Folkwit Records in the UK. She also wrote a book in 2011, entitled “The Need to Be Heard” about her experiences in the music business. Audrey’s music  has evolved over the years into an eclectic form of singer-songwriter indie rock performed as a “one-man-band” multi-instrumentalist using loops on guitar as well as accordion, ukulele, banjo, drums, vibraphone and other unique instrumentation. Overall this music blends together her early influences of Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, John Fahey, and Bob Dylan with contemporaries such as Sufjan Stevens, Robert Wyatt, Radiohead, Dungen, Wilco, Steroelab, and Arcade Fire. She performs nationally and internationally and reside on the east coast.

Audrey was nominated “Best Folk Act” at the Boston Music Awards in 2009, which adds to her nominations for “Outstanding Singer-Songwriter of the Year” in 2008 at the BMA’s and “Best Female Vocalist” in 2009 and “Best Folk Act” in 2010 in the Boston Phoenix Music Poll. She also won the “Riving Rising Star 2009″ competition sponsored by WXRV 92.5FM the River. Audrey has shared the stage with Suzanne Vega, They Might be Giants, Grace Potter, Josh Ritter, Sam Amidon, Beth Orton, Glen Hansard, Ra Ra Riot, among others.

 

RELEASES:

6/16/2012: A release of both old & new material entitled “Sirens” is not out and available at shows and online.

3/5/2011: The newest record “Thick Skin” is out Spring 2011. CD Release shows are scheduled for the Spring and Summer. You can purchase it at: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/audreyryan4

10/20/2009:  “I Know, I Know” is up on itunes and on cdbaby.com for your purchase. It was released the fall of 2009 in the US and in Europe. To get a copy of her the new record online look it up on itunes or get a physical copy from this link:http://www.cdbaby.com/audreyryan3

9/27/2007: “Dishes & Pills” released. This was the record that got the attention of Folkwit Records in the UK and got Audrey her first management company. Considered a seminal work and breakthrough record for her.

 

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Buy “Dishes & Pills” on CD Baby!

Listen to interview on MPBN’s “Maine Things Considered”:

Maine Native Audrey Ryan to perform in Portland

PRESS QUOTES:

“Make sure to check out Audrey Ryan. The sweet and quirky avant rocker – for fans of everyone from Flaming Lips to Nellie McKay…”       -Boston Globe

“A lush, beautifully arranged slice of indie pop, “Dishes & Pills” is the work of an intelligent songwriter and composer with a clear vision of the music. There are elements of baroque ’60s pop such as The Zombies or the Beach Boys, but her clear musical contemporaries are ambitious, sensitive, smart songwriters such as Sufjan Stevens, John Vanderslice, and Feist.” – Bangor Daily

“Theatrical, quirky, feels orchestral while remaining stripped-down; the Decemberists with a female singer — a very good thing.” -Mass Live

“A genuine weirdo, Ryan’s songwriting and vocal style also might remind one of more modern female artists from Bjork to Shivaree to The Softies, and the menagerie of instrumentation is more out on the lunatic fringe à la the Dresden Dolls or Daniel Johnston. It’s a truly enjoyable musical schizophrenia that you could listen to 50 times and still hear something different each time.” -Valley Advocate

“The result is a sprawling epic of indie-folk ingenuity. Structurally, her tunes are pure pop. But she infuses her arrangements with a jazz sensibility, expertly decking out the tunes with all the bells and whistles — quite literally, in most cases. Her work here more closely resembles the experimental folk orchestrations of Sufjan Stevens. Like Michigan’s eclectic tunesmith, Ryan excels at crafting quirkily diverse soundscapes that augment her intricate wordplay. Also like Stevens, her real strength lies in her subtly engaging songwriting; despite the wealth of aural delicacies found on Dishes & Pills, one gets the feeling that these songs would be just as effective if stripped down to guitar and Ryan’s charmingly expressive voice.” -Seven Days (Dan Bolles)

“Ryan’s inventive songwriting, which adds surreal sounds and multifarious instrumentation to a solid folk-rock core, keeps all 14 tracks sounding mostly fresh and original. The wildly diverse instrumentation peppers each song with new trinkets of spacey and intriguing sound that dangles like fish bait around the listener’s ear. Her highly personal lyrics are also absorbing. Although most of the songs have a lighthearted feel, the words are often cynical and self-deprecating, addressing topics that range from cancer to dead-end relationships to pills, marijuana and booze. Some of the songs are heavier than others, both lyrically and musically, but the imaginative spirit never wanes” -The Wire

“quite similar to Aimee Mann, she melds a pretty voice with gently eccentric instrumentation popular in the contemporary indie scene (accordion, glockenspiel), producing results both ambitious and likeable.” -Portland Phoenix

“Ryan is like Joni Mitchell and Radiohead playing some kind of hybrid jazz music that- and this is why her stuff is so good – just doesnt exist anywhere else.” -Leo Weekly (Louisville, KY)

“Anything but formulaic. With its liberal use of jazz progressions, quick tempo shifts, and a vast sea of musical influences, the album has myriad sounds and reflections.” -Seven Days (Burlington, VT)